Political Ecology Network


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The Jacobin’s eco-modernist dilemma

ENTITLE blog - a collaborative writing project on Political Ecology

by Stefania Barca

The answers to the climate crisis and to an ecological socialism must be searched for, not in ecomodernism, but  in the intersection of ecological, feminist, and socialist perspectives.

Editors’ note: This is the second in a series of ENTITLE blog articles that critically engage with the ongoing discussions about “eco-modernist socialism” and “communist futurism”, projected in Jacobin magazine’s climate change issue ‘Earth, Wind, and Fire.’  Our series continues the debate with critical insights that question the foundations of these proposals. In particular, whether they imply a substantive transformation of current capitalist socio-ecological regimes, or their continuation and even expansion. The series began with an article by Aaron Vansintjan and will also feature contributions by Eric Pineault and Emanuele Leonardi

The Jacobin’s Earth Wind and Fire issue has raised justified concerns from within the ecosocialist family, in view of its marked ecomodernist ethos. I share this concern about…

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Nature 3.0 – Will blockchain technology and cryptocurrencies save the planet?

ENTITLE blog - a collaborative writing project on Political Ecology

by Sian Sullivan

Can new cryptocurrencies finance projects with positive environmental impacts, whilst unlocking ‘the $120 trillion natural capital market’? Mining cryptocurrency through appealing to environmental concerns seem more consistent with speculative tendencies in an era of financialised neoliberalism than attuned with practices of environmental care and equitable distribution of value.

image 1. Blockchained earth. Source: Front News International.

First there was Nature. Sometimes an Edenic garden, whose fruitfulness we live with in peace and reciprocity; sometimes a vast wilderness to be feared, tamed or worshiped. But always a lively mesh of entities, whose magnificent diversity is now threatened by a single biological species – Homo sapiens.

Then came Nature 2.0. A material world progressively understood, shared and commoditised in user-generated digital information cascading through multi-player communities inhabiting Web 2.0 – exemplified, perhaps, by the aptly named Second Life. In this technologically inscribed and consumed world…

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POLLEN18 registration is now open!

Registration for the POLLEN18 conference ‘Political Ecology, the Green Economy, and Alternative Sustainabilities’ (in Oslo 20-22 June 2018) is now open. The registration website can be accessed at the following link: https://webshop.hioa.no/produkt/pollen18-conference/

Please note that the registration deadline for presenters and session organizers/conveners is 01 March 2018.

Due to extremely high demand for limited conference places, registration is currently restricted only to those who have submitted a paper or panel proposal to the conference. Co-authors and other non-presenting or non-convening attendees will be invited to register at a later stage.

If you experience difficulties with registration, inquires can be directed to the conference email address: politicalecology18@gmail.com.

We look forward to welcoming you in Oslo!


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The shitty new communist futurism

ENTITLE blog - a collaborative writing project on Political Ecology

By Aaron Vansintjan

Let us dream big. But without considering the limits to the shit we consume and generate, our heads will stay in the clouds.  

Editors’ note: This is the first in a series of ENTITLE blog articles that critically engage with the ongoing discussions about “eco-modernist socialism” and “communist futurism”, projected in Jacobin magazine’s climate change issue ‘Earth, Wind, and Fire.’  Our series continues the debate with critical insights that question the foundations of these proposals. In particular, whether they imply a substantive transformation of current capitalist socio-ecological regimes, or their continuation and even expansion. The series will also feature contributions by Stefania Barca and Emanuele Leonardi.

Why languish in despair? After decades of neoliberal cutbacks and in the face of climate disaster, something new is appearing on the horizon: the willingness to think big. With the rise of Jeremy Corbyn and Bernie Sanders, the Left has caught…

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Disrupted Landscapes: State, Peasants and the Politics of Land in Postsocialist Romania

ENTITLE blog - a collaborative writing project on Political Ecology

by Marco Armiero

How many times have we repeated to each other that there is a need, an urgent need, for a political ecology of post-socialist countries? Thereby, we should warmly welcome Stefan Dorondel’s insightful ethnographic research on two villages in post-socialist Romania: Disrupted Landscapes: State, Peasants and the Politics of Land in Postsocialist Romania (Bergham Press, 2016).

DorondelDisrupted

First of all, let’s start with a disclaimer which I believe it is appropriate for the Entitle blog. In writing about this volume I do have a conflict of interest; I know the author well and we are friends. I have been following Stefan’s work since many years, always learning from him and enjoying the company of an acute colleague and a kind friend.

Academia is a strange planet, where we pretend to be blind, while we see very well and sometimes we believe we see everything while being rather blind. As a community…

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The planned development of Hellenikon: A sacrifice that needs to be contested

ENTITLE blog - a collaborative writing project on Political Ecology

What will happen in the area of ​​the former Hellenikon airport and the coast of Ag. Kosmas is not only an issue that concerns the inhabitants of the neighboring municipalities. It transgresses locality – affecting all citizens of Athens – and it questions environmental justice in the city, the access to green and blue amenities, and the sale-out and privatization of common goods.

hellenikon The former airport of Hellinikon and the coastal front of Ag.Kosmas, Athens

Communication from the initiative “A Park for all in Hellenikon”

The case of Hellenikon appears to be “done and dusted”. The contract has already been signed between the Greek State and the so-called investors. The Integrated Development Plan (IDP), which describes the overall development project (including new urbanization, tourist attractions, hotels, casino, conference centre, and a so-called Metropolitan Park), was filed last August (!) 2017. Within the prohibitively short time-frame of 20 days, the statutory consultation…

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In memory of James O’Connor (1930-2017) – II part

ENTITLE blog - a collaborative writing project on Political Ecology

What follows is the second part of six contributions (here the first part) by scholars and activists who responded to a call circulated via the ENTITLE network in November 2017, shortly after James O’Connor’s death. Our intent was to solicit personal reflections and memories on how O’Connor had influenced people who encountered his work in different ways and across three different generations.

james o connor James O’Connor in 1978 (photo courtesy of the UC-Santa Cruz Digital Collections)

Salvatore Engel Di Mauro

We mourn the sudden loss of a visionary and highly influential thinker, James Richard O’Connor, co-founder with Barbara Laurence of Capitalism Nature Socialism and the Center for Political Ecology. O’Connor was a rigorous, indefatigable intellectual and a committed Polanyian Marxist activist. His thoughts have reached and shaped the minds of thousands of people, including mine, and I trust thousands more will benefit from his insights.

He wrote on a wide…

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